Keys to the Past

Local Histories

Starting with H - 47 Settlements found.

A B C D E F G H I K L M N O P Q R S T U W

Haltwhistle (Northumberland)
Haltwhistle lies in south-west Northumberland, close to the county boundary with Cumbria. The parish stretches from Cawfields Crags in the north, down to the River South Tyne. The name Haltwhistle means a hill between the fork of a river, such as between the Haltwhistle Burn and the River South Tyne. Archaeological remains date from prehistoric to more recent times, but there are more Roman remains than any other period....


Hamsterley (County Durham)
The village of Hamsterley lies between Weardale and Teesdale, to the north of Wolsingham. It was originally part of the parish of St Andrew's Auckland, which is several miles to the east....


Harbottle (Northumberland)
The civil parish of Harbottle lies on the edge of the Cheviots, in Upper Coquetdale. It includes high moorland in the north and west of the parish. The River Coquet runs from north to south on the eastern side of the parish. The centres of population are the villages of Harbottle, Holystone and Sharperton....


Hartburn (Northumberland)
Hartburn parish lies in the lowlands of central Northumberland not far from the county town of Morpeth. The River Wansbeck and the Hart Burn cross the parish from west to east with rolling farmland between. The burn cuts through a picturesque wooded ravine around Hartburn village which is the largest settlement in the parish. The earliest archaeological remains are thousands of years old and the most recent are from the early 20th century....


Hartleyburn (Northumberland)
Hartleyburn parish lies in the very south-west corner of Northumberland, on the county boundary with Cumbria. Much of the parish is the high moorland of Hartleyburn Common with the valley of the Hartley Burn cutting through the centre and the hamlet of Halton-Lea-Gate at the foot of the fells. Archaeological remains in the parish date from prehistoric times through to more recent times and many are clustered around the Kellah Burn....


Harwood in Teesdale (County Durham)
Harwood-in-Teesdale lies high in the North Pennines at the western end of Teesdale. Although the land around the river is used for farming, much of the rougher surrounding moorland is now only used for grazing sheep. However, although the area now a peaceful rural area it was once a hive of industry. Like much of the North Pennines, in the 18th and 19th century, lead mining was the major employer. The remains of a series of lead mines, mainly owned by the London Lead Company can still be seen in the area. Close to the main road are the remains of the Ashgill mine- the course of the road has been slightly changed preserving a 19th century stone bridge, probably also built b the London Lead Company. Just to the north can be the ruined remains of a level and a colliery building; nearby is a mine shop. In the surrounding area are traces of many hushes and levels. Similar remains can also be seen at Cow Green. There are also traces of lead ore smelting. Although the smelting furnaces are no longer preserves, the remains of other stages of the process are still visible. For example, at Green Hurth the foundations of a 19th century water wheel can be seen. This is probably of mid-19th century date. At Backside the foundations of another water wheel can be seen. These water wheels were used to drive machinery which crushed the lead ore into a powder which could more easily processed. At Backside the remains of other parts of the processing industry, such as a washing floor and some circular buddles can also be seen....


Haswell; Haswell Plough (County Durham)
Sadly, we know little about Haswell or Haswell Plough before the medieval period. There was certainly some kind of settlement here in the Anglo-Saxon period, as the name of the villages are derived from Old English meaning 'hazel spring or stream'. However, the village was only first recorded (as Hessewella and Hessewelle) in the 12th century. Haswell consists of three parts, Haswell, Haswell Plough and High Haswell. the original village of Haswell was sited at High Haswell where only a few farms and dwelling houses remain. A charter, dating to around 1300 recorded the remains of a medieval chapel. In a field called Chapel Garth, the foundations of what are supposed to have been this chapel could be traced. A holy water stoup was found here, and is now used as a font in the mission-church at Haswell Plough....


Haughton-le-Skerne (County Durham)
Haughton-le-Skerne was a village until 1930,when Darlington County extended its boundaries. It stands about a mile and a half from Dalrington, and lies on the banks of the River Skerne. The village was first recorded in 1050 as Haltun,which in old English means farmstead on a haugh (haugh being a piece of flat land near a river). Later under Norman French influence the term 'le Skerne' (river) was added. Remains of the medieval village are present in the form of earthworks in the villages SW corner, whilst St Andrew's church (dating to c1125) and associated rectory (1200s) are the oldest standing buildings in this area....


Hauxley (Northumberland)
Hauxley parish lies on the North Sea coast in mid-Northumberland. The parish is relatively low lying and made up of fertile farmland and a rocky island called Coquet Island, which lies about one kilometre offshore. The area has a long history with remains dating from prehistoric submerged forests to 19th century coal mines....


Hawthorn (County Durham)
The village of Hawthorn lies on a slight rise half a mile north of Easington. The North Sea runs along the eastern edge of the parish. Much of the coastal area, known as Hawthorn Dene, is particularly attractive and the land is owned by the National Trust....


Haydon (Northumberland)
The civil parish of Haydon stretches from the lowland Tyne Valley, north to Hadrian's Wall and south to the edge of the North Pennines. The main settlement is Haydon Bridge, where a bridge has spanned a crossing point on the River Tyne for at least 700 years....


Headlam (County Durham)
Headlam lies to the west of Darlington, just to the north of Gainford. It was once part of the large parish of Gainford, but is now a parish in its own right. The earliest evidence for occupation in the parish dates to the Neolithic period- around 4000BC to 2300BC. A Stone hammer of this date was found here in 1905. Such hammers may have partly been used to clear trees from the land before it was ploughed for farming. Several other fragments of flint tools of prehistoric date have been found elsewhere in the parish....


Healey (Northumberland)
Healey parish lies in south Northumberland on the boundary with County Durham. It rises from the north to the watershed of the rivers Tyne and Derwent at Barleyhill and the high fells around Derwent Reservoir. Archaeological remains date from the Roman period to more recent times....


Healeyfield (County Durham)
A number of war memorials can be found in the village of Castleside that reflect the contribution of the parish of Healeyfield to the war effort during the First World War and WW2. A number of memorials including plaques, windows and rolls of honour are located within St. John's Church and within the Wesleyan Methodist Church whilst a memorial obelisk can be found within the old churchyard of the village.


Hebron (Northumberland)
The civil parish of Hebron lies just north of Northumberland's county town of Morpeth. It is fertile farmland cut by two of the county's major roads, the A1 from Newcastle to Berwick and A697 to Coldstream. The main settlement is Hebron village, a small community of less than 1000 people, with other hamlets and farms scattered across the parish....


Heddon-on-the-Wall (Northumberland)
Heddon-on-the-Wall lies in south Northumberland, on the boundary with Tyneside, overlooking the Tyne valley. As its name suggests, one of the most famous archaeological monuments in the country runs across the parish, Hadrian's Wall....


Hedgeley (Northumberland)
The civil parish of Hedgeley is located on the eastern fringe of the Cheviot Hills. The parish is largely upland moorland, descending to the valley of the River Aln at its southern extent and to the Breamish Valley in the north. Most of Hedgeley's population is concentrated in the village of Powburn, although there are a number of hamlets and farmsteads scattered throughout the parish....


Hedley-on-the-Hill (Northumberland)
Hedley is a small parish lying between the valley of the River Derwent and the watershed to the Tyne....


Hedleyhope (County Durham)
Hedleyhope lies in the valley of the Dearness, not far from Tow Law. The small settlement traditionally looked towards the larger village of Satley, which itself was part of the parish of Lanchester until the mid-19th century. The name of the village comes from the Old English word 'hedley' or 'headlam', which means 'heathery clearing'; 'hope' is an Old English word for valley, so the place name means literally 'valley of the heathery clearing'. It was first recorded in the Boldon Book in 1183. The small hamlets of the Low and High Hedleyhope are probably the site of the medieval village, though a geophysical survey at High Hedleyhope did not find any archaeological remains....


Heighington (County Durham)
The village of Heighington lies about six miles to the north-west of Darlington. The parish once included the townships of Coatsay Moor, Heighington, Middridge Grange, Redworth, School Aycliffe and Walworth.This parish is now bounded on the north by New Shildon parish, on the west and south-west by Gainford and Denton, on the south by Darlington, on the south-east by Haughton-le-Skerne, and on the east by Aycliffe....


Henshaw (Northumberland)
Henshaw civil parish lies in west Northumberland, on the border with Cumbria. It stretches from the banks of the River South Tyne northward into the remote lands of Wark Forest and the banks of the River Irthing. For the most part, only the southern part of the parish has any settlement in it today and this is largely concentrated along the very southern edge in the Tyne Valley. Archaeological remains date from the Bronze Age onwards, but the most famous are probably those of Hadrian's Wall....


Hepple (Northumberland)
Hepple lies in central Northumberland, with the River Coquet running across the north-east portion of the parish. The village of Hepple is situated by a bend in the river and much of the south-west part of the parish is taken up by woodland. The oldest finds in the parish date to the Neolithic period and include an arrowhead, axe head and other types of flint implement. This was a time when a more settled way of life was developing, with less reliance on hunter-gathering....


Hepscott (Northumberland)
The civil parish of Hepscott is located south-east of the town of Morpeth. People have lived here for thousands of years. Flint tools have been found at Hepscott, showing that prehistoric farmers were living in the area as long as 6000 years ago. In the later prehistoric period, people used flint to make tools such as blades, points and scrapers. These tools were used in weapons such as spears, and arrows. They were also used to make tools for working wood and leather, and for preparing food....


Hesledon (County Durham)
The eastern edge of the parish is formed by a stretch of the North Sea coast from Blackhall Colliery and Castle Eden in the north to Crimdon Dene running through Crimdon Park in the south. This stretch has numerous military sites relating to the defence of the coast during WW2, including practice trenches and pillboxes, but there is also a rifle range on historic maps of the late 19th century. This rifle range was likely in use as a military training site during the First World War and has been noted as disused by 1919....


Hesledon (County Durham)
Hesleden lies in the east of County Durham, just to the south of Castle Eden and close toTrimdon. The North Sea bounds the parish on the eastern side. The small village of Hulam, which is part of the parish, lies nearby. The village of Monk Hesledon stands on the verge of a deep wooded dene or valley about a mile and a half from the sea. It was first recorded in 1324, though as its named comes from the Old English for 'hazel valley' and shows that there may have been an Anglo-Saxon settlement nearby. There was also a medieval village close to Hulam, though no remains of it can be seen today....


Hett (County Durham)
The earliest mentions of the village of Hett date to 1168 and 1335. The name of Hett comes from the Old English word meaning hat, given the shape and markings of the slight hill on which the village stands. Little is known about the early history of the area. It is only in the medieval period that we begin to know more about the area. Particularly important is a medieval charter that was written in 1451. It recorded that two boundary stones marked with a cross should be put up in the village, although no signs of these stones survives today. The charter also recorded a medieval mill. Although the remains of a mill race can be seen nearby, it is probably of post-medieval date. An early document also recorded that there was a coal pit at Hett, although its precise location is not known. Coal mining has been important throughout the history of Hett. In 1966 opencast coal mining in Hett cut into the remains of a possible 18th century coal mine. The remains may even be older, but there was no firm dating evidence from this site....


Hexham (Northumberland)
The town of Hexham is located near the confluence of the rivers North and South Tyne. Its location has been strongly influenced by its position on a significant east-west cross country route and close to the easiest crossing point over the river. The site is one where there is a good water supply and the land is suitable for cultivation, so it has been an ideal location for settlement for many centuries....


Hexhamshire and District (Northumberland)
The civil parish of Hexhamshire lies in south Northumberland. It is in the North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and borders County Durham. Much of the parish is the high and remote moorland of Hexhamshire Common cut by small tributaries of the Devil's Water, Rowley Burn and Ham Burn. Many small farmsteads have been built on the hillsides above the Devil's Water and the largest settlement is Whitley Chapel....


Hexhamshire and District (Northumberland)
Hexhamshire Low Quarter civil parish lies in south Northumberland, partly in the North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The parish stretches from Stublick Moor in the west to the valley of the Devil's Water in the east and is bound by the Dipton Burn along much of its northern edge. There are many small farmsteads and hamlets in the parish....


High Coniscliffe (County Durham)
The parish of Coniscliffe, which comprises the townships of High or Church Coniscliffe, and Low Coniscliffe, is bounded on the north by Heighington, on the west by Gainford, on the south by the river Tees, and on the east by Darlington. It stands on the edge of a long ridge fo limestone rock, about half a mile from the north bank of the River Tees. At this point the drop down from the top of the ridge is very steep. It is this drop that provides the -cliffe part of the village's name. The first half of the name probably comes from the Old Norse for 'King'- suggesting that the village name means 'King's Cliff'....


High Force (County Durham)
High Force lies in the parish of Romaldkirk, upstream from the small town of Middleton, in Teesdale. It is believed to be the highest waterfall in Britain. The river Tees, which rises several miles further up the dale, flows down the valley until this point, where the hard whin sill rocks give way to the softer limestones of the lower part of the valley. The river suddenly plunges over 20m into a large pool. In dry weather the river flows through only one major channel, but when the river is swollen by rain it also flows through a second smaller channel. It is now an important tourist attraction on the Raby Estates. A footbridge crosses the river allowing visitors access to the best views of the falls. A number of other bridges nearby, such as {Holwick Head Bridge] allow access to the farms on the other side of the river from the main road. As is common elsewhere in the North Pennines, there are a number of quarries nearby, such as {High Force Quarry D4535} and High Force Hotel Quarry, which provided road stone. Lead mining is confined to the higher hillsides of Teesdale; the area around High Force itself is dominated by sheep and arable farming. A whitewashed 18th or 19th century stone barn stands at Bridge House Farm. Sheep folds and washfolds can also be seen nearby.


Hilton (County Durham)
Hilton is a small village, about eight miles to the north-west of Darlington, and close to West Auckland and Staindrop. There are few early remains from the parish. The most important building is Hilton Hall. Although it is now mainly of 16th century date it contains the remains of an earlier, medieval chapel, dedicated to the Blessed Catherine. This was built by Thomas Baldor in 1219. It was rectangular in shape and had thick stone walls....


Holmside (County Durham)
The village of Holmside lies a couple of miles north of Lanchester, to the south of Stanley. The main monument is the manor house. It was probably built in the 15th century, and although it has been altered since traces of the earliest building can still be seen. A line of buildings stood along the north side of the courtyard. One of these buildings may have been a chapel. Medieval stone windows can still be seen, as well as the carved stone figure of a man blowing a musical instrument. Another possible chapel can be seen in the buildings to the south of the courtyard. There are also the remains of a moat that once surrounded the hall. This may have been to defend the inhabitants against raids from Scotland, though moats were also built as a sign of status, to show how important the owner was.


Holwick (County Durham)
Holwick lies in Upper Teesdale to the north-west of Middleton-in-Teesdale. Most of the area is covered by high moors and fells....


Holy Island (Northumberland)
Holy Island, or Lindisfarne as it is also known, is a tidal island located about one mile off the north Northumberland coast. Access to the island is across a causeway, first built in 1954. This causeway is only accessible at low tide, the times of which can be obtained from the Northumberland County Council web site (www.northumberland.gov.uk). This beautiful coastline is designated as a Heritage Coast and is also an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Much of the island is designated as a Conservation Area and the village itself is located on the south side of the island. It is close to this village that Holy Island's most famous sites can be found ' Lindisfarne Castle and Lindisfarne Priory. However, the archaeology of Holy Island starts thousands of years before either monument was built....


Horden (County Durham)
The village lies on the east coast of Durham, to the south of Easington Colliery and east of Peterlee. It stands close to one of the many 'denes' - narrow valleys - that run down to the sea along this part of the Durham coast....


Horncliffe (Northumberland)
Horncliffe parish lies on the south bank of the River Tweed in north Northumberland....


Horsley (Northumberland)
Horsley is a small parish rising from the banks of the River Tyne opposite Prudhoe to moderately high pasture and arable fields around Welton....


Houghall (County Durham)
Houghall lies just to the south of Durham City on the banks of the River Wear. Although close to the town it has not been overgrown by modern houses. Instead the presence of sports grounds and Houghall College ensure that the area remains green and attractive. It is still overlooked by the heavily wooded sloped of Mount Joy and Maidens Castle to the north....


Howden-le-Wear (County Durham)
Howden-le-Wear is a quiet village not far from Crook....


Humshaugh (Northumberland)
Humshaugh lies in mid-Northumberland on the banks of the River North Tyne, a few kilometres north of Hexham. Archaeological remains in the parish date from prehistoric times to the 20th century. The most famous remains are Roman, with Hadrian's Wall, its milecastles, turrets, and the impressive remains of Chesters Roman fort....


Hunderthwaite (County Durham)
The small village of Hundersthwaite lies to the south of Romaldkirk....


Hunstanworth (County Durham)
The village of Hunstanworth lies in the very north of Durham close to the border with Northumberland. It is just to the south of Blanchland, the site of an important medieval monastery. It is close to a particularly beautiful stretch of the River Derwent....


Hunwick (County Durham)
Hunwick is an attractive ancient village dating from Saxon times when it belonged to the Cathedral church of Durham. It stands amidst the decayed industrial landscape between Bishop Auckland and Crook. It was later given to earls of Northumberland, but it returned to the ownership of the church when Henry VIII re-endowed Durham cathedral. The village itself was probably destroyed during the Harrying of the North in the late 11th century, and was rebuilt with two rows of houses arranged around the village green....


Hurworth (County Durham)
The village of Hurworth lies on the banks of the River Tees, about three miles to the south of Darlington. The earliest settlement from this area may be of prehistoric date. Aerial photographs of the area around Round Hill may be the slight traces of a prehistoric field system, though the dating evidence is not certain....


Hutton Henry (County Durham)
The village of Hutton Henry lies in east Durham, just to the south of Peterlee and not far from the North Sea coast....


Hutton Magna (County Durham)
Hutton Magna lies in the south of Durham to the south-east of Barnard Castle. It was in fact in North Yorkshire until 1974. It sits in a wide rolling landscape of lush farmland. The village itself is a single street of low stone cottages....
A B C D E F G H I K L M N O P Q R S T U W