Keys to the Past

Local Histories

Starting with D - 9 Settlements found.

A B C D E F G H I K L M N O P Q R S T U W

Dalton-le-Dale (County Durham)
The village of Dalton-le-Dale lies in the east of County Durham close to the North Sea coast, just to the west of Seaham. Although many important prehistoric remains have been found nearby, there is no surviving evidence of settlement in Dalton-le-Dale until the Anglo-Saxon period. The first part of the village name- Dalton - comes from the Old English for 'farmstead in a valley' (Dael-tun). 'Le Dale' was added in the medieval period to distinguish it from another Dalton - Dalton Piercy....


Darlington (County Durham)
The town of Darlington stands on the River Skerne, which is a tributary of the Tees. It is on the southern edge of the County and lies about 20 miles to the south of Durham. Although it owes its growth in the 19th century to the rise of its industries and the growth of the railways, it is now a pleasant town, with many town parks and leafy suburbs....


Delves (County Durham)
The village of Delves lies just to the south-east of Consett....


Denton (County Durham)
The pretty village of Denton is a group of whitewashed farm buildings and cottages standing around the Cocker Beck. It lies to the north-east of Gainford....


Denwick (Northumberland)
The small village of Denwick lies in one corner of the parish that, unusually, is divided into two separate areas to the north and south of Alnwick. The southern portion is known as a detached part of the parish. The parish contains a mixture of rich farmland in rolling countryside in the south and east, and higher land to the north and west. Part of the parish lies within the historic parkland called Hulne Park, now part of Alnwick Castle parkland. The ownership of large parts of the parish by the Duke of Northumberland can be seen in many of the buildings of the parish, from boundary stones and farms to the estate village of Denwick itself, many of which bear the Percy crescent carved into their stonework. The name Denwick means 'valley-farm and building' or 'the farm in the valley.'....


Dipton (County Durham)
The parish of Dipton lies between the industrial towns of Stanley and Consett around 10 miles to the south-west of Newcastle. Although Dipton is now the main settlement, until the later 19th century this was just one of a series of small hamlets in the area, including Dipton, Collierley, Dykes and Pontop....


Doddington (Northumberland)
Doddington parish lies in north Northumberland. It rises from the Milfield Basin up to a sandstone ridge, where there are crags and rocky outcrops, and a more level area with gentler east facing slopes. The parish is rich in prehistoric remains and is perhaps best known for its cup and ring marked stones....


Duddo (Northumberland)
Duddo parish lies in north Northumberland on the border with Scotland. It has a rich variety of archaeological sites, with numerous cropmarks, and important monuments and buildings from the prehistoric, medieval and post-medieval periods....


Durham City (County Durham)
The First World War has left quite a legacy within the built heritage of Durham, from the use of buildings as an active part of the war effort to the public display of memorials after the war commemorating those of Durham who served, fought and died in service of their country. Many of the grand Georgian buildings around Old Elvet, Market Place and Hallgarth were used for military purposes during the conflict serving as residential bilets, offices, stables, stores and training sites. The former {railway station D6413} on Gilesgate was used as a Goods Station and transport hub for the movement of provisions, whilst at times the Nationwide bank building was used as a store for such provisions. On the peninsular there are numerous sites within the Cathedral, Castle and University buildings and chapels where memorials attest to the contribution made by inhabitants of Durham to the war effort. The Cathedral itself has a large number of memorials from wall plaques and memorial windows to items of furniture and ornaments donated by families in dedication of lost loved ones. It also contains the DLI chapel which is furnished with numerous memorials dedicated to the service of the Durham Light Infantry in the First World War and various other conflicts. The memorialisation of those who served is a common feature of the city with memorials located in churches, public buildings and spaces. Some of these memorials are no longer visible, such as the WW1 tank in Wharton Park and the guns that were placed outside the Castle gates for a period before being dragged to the river and dumped by ex-servicemen - but even though these are no longer visible their records still add to the story of Durham's involvement in the Great War.
A B C D E F G H I K L M N O P Q R S T U W