Keys to the Past

The Old Gaol (Hexham)

Old Gaol, Hexham. Photo Northumberland County Council, 1971.
Old Gaol, Hexham. Photo Northumberland County Council, 1971.

The Old Gaol is a rectangular stone tower with three floors. It has stone walls, over 2m thick at ground level. It entered through a door on the west side. The building has two large stone cellars, which were originally used as prisons. They were entered through a trapdoor in the floor of the ground floor. It was one of the first purpose-built prisons in Britain, and was built in the mid-14th century. It is a Scheduled Monument and Grade I Listed Building protected by law.

Reference number:N8731
Historical period: Medieval (1066 to 1540)
Legal status:Conservation area
Listed Building
Scheduled Ancient Monument
Event(s):FIELD SURVEY, Archaeological Survey of Hexham 1988; ARCHAEOLOGICAL UNIT FOR NORTH EAST ENGLAND
PHOTOGRAMMETRIC SURVEY, The Two Towers of Hexham - The Old Gaol 1992; P Ryder



See also:
Source of Reference
Local History of Hexham


Disclaimer -

Please note that this information has been compiled from a number of different sources. Durham County Council and Northumberland County Council can accept no responsibility for any inaccuracy contained therein. If you wish to use/copy any of the images, please ensure that you read the Copyright information provided.