Keys to the Past

Alnwick Town Walls (Alnwick)

Bondgate Tower, Alnwick. Photo Northumberland County Council, 1968.
Bondgate Tower, Alnwick. Photo Northumberland County Council, 1968.

The Earl of Northumberland was given permission by the King Henry V to build walls around Alnwick in 1434. It took a long time to build the walls, and they were not completed for over fifty years. They were 2m thick and over 6m high. Each of its four entrances were defended by strong towers. The wall ran from Hotspur Street and Green Batt to the site of the Clayport Gate, along Dispensary Street to Pottergate. Pottergate is an 18th century rebuilding of the original medieval gate. The wall continued down Northumberland Street across to Narrow Gate, At this point it joined the defences of Alnwick Castle. Despite its size, nothing remains of the walls today.

Reference number:N4497
Historical period: Medieval (1066 to 1540)
Legal status:Conservation area
Listed Building
Scheduled Ancient Monument
Event(s):WATCHING BRIEF, Greenwell Road, Alnwick 2001; Bernicia Archaeology
TRIAL TRENCH, Beal's Yard, Alnwick 2002; Tyne and Wear Museums
WATCHING BRIEF, Electricity cable installation at Hotspur Street and Bondgate Without, Alnwick 2010; Bamburgh Research Project

To find out more about a particular site, please click the Identify button (i) on the toolbar, then click the site on the map.
The Historic maps option is only available when the map scale is between 2500 and 10000.




See also:
Source of Reference
Local History of Alnwick


Disclaimer -

Please note that this information has been compiled from a number of different sources. Durham County Council and Northumberland County Council can accept no responsibility for any inaccuracy contained therein. If you wish to use/copy any of the images, please ensure that you read the Copyright information provided.