Keys to the Past

Barforth Hall (Barforth)

Barforth Hall © Ryder, P 2006
Barforth Hall © Ryder, P 2006

Barforth Hall © Ryder, P 2006
Barforth Hall © Ryder, P 2006

Barforth Hall © Ryder, P 2006
Barforth Hall © Ryder, P 2006

Barforth Hall © Ryder, P 2006
Barforth Hall © Ryder, P 2006

Barforth Hall © Ryder, P 2006
Barforth Hall © Ryder, P 2006

Barforth Hall © Ryder, P 2006
Barforth Hall © Ryder, P 2006

This farmhouse was once the manor of Barforth. There is a main building and two wings. Most of its older features would appear to date from the beginning of the 16th century, One of the ground-floor rooms was probably once a small chapel. It is possible that it was once the chapel of the Pudsey family who lived at Barforth- often known as Old Richmond.

The estate came into the possession of the (Pudsey) family, by the marriage of Henry Puidsey with Elizabeth, the daughter and heiress of Sir John Laton of Barford, in the time of Edward III; and continued in it until 1659 when it was sold to Barrington Bouchier of Benningborough, near York, by the trustees, for the payment of the debts of Ambrose Pudsey, for £10,050. It is now the property of the Earl of Harewood, who purchased it of Walter Fawkes, Esq, of Farnley: and in the occupation of Robert Clarke esq.

The house stands in a low sheltered spot, on a curvature of the Tees. It is a substantial stone building of the fifteenth century, and has been of a quadrangular form with square-headed windows. The entrance to the court is through a spacious arch on the north side, and from thence to the interior of the house through a much smaller arch opposite, with a depressed head. The door is still defended by a bolt of oak, about three inches square, which is drawn to and fro in a recess in the wall. The hall is now divided, and its ample chimney converted into a wine cellar. In a large apartment on the east side of the court, is a rude oaken table, whose top is formed out of one massy plank. In the pavement, before the large arch on the north, is the figure of an antique fleur-de-lys, formed in coloured pebbles.

Reference number:D1598

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See also:
Source of Reference
Local History of Barforth


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Please note that this information has been compiled from a number of different sources. Durham County Council and Northumberland County Council can accept no responsibility for any inaccuracy contained therein. If you wish to use/copy any of the images, please ensure that you read the Copyright information provided.